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Please Note: Please only attend the Surgery if you have an appointment. A member of the Reception Team will check your temperature before allowing you access to the building. All enquiries are currently being dealt with by telephone. Thank you for your patience.

Coronavirus Update

PLEASE NOTE: All GP appointments are telephone consultations. If the GP wishes to see a patient they will invite them to attend the Surgery following a telephone consultation.   Nursing appointments are available.

If you need to attend the surgery, you must now wear a face covering (over 5 years only). This can be as simple as a scarf or bandana covering your mouth and nose. Information on face coverings is available on the below link.

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-to-wear-and-make-a-cloth-face-covering/how-to-wear-and-make-a-cloth-face-covering

Please do not come to the Surgery if you have a high temperature, a new continuous cough, flu like symptoms or loss of taste or smell.

The practice closes every Wednesday lunch time from 12:30 - 13:30 for staff development.

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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

0 October, 201

AAA stands for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. The aorta is the main blood vessel that supplies blood to your body. It runs from your heart down through your chest and abdomen.

AAAIn some people, as they get older, the wall of the aorta in the abdomen can become weak. It can then start to expand and form what is called an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The condition is most common in men aged 65 and above. Men are six times more likely to have an aneurysm than women and your risk of having an aneurysm increases if you are or have been a smoker, you have high blood pressure or you have a close family member who has had one.

If you have an AAA you will not usually notice any signs or symptoms; this means cannot tell if you have one, will not feel any pain or notice anything different. Large aneurysms are rare but can be very serious. As the wall of the aorta stretches it becomes weak and can burst, causing internal bleeding. Around 85% die when an aneurysm bursts.

An aorta that is only slightly larger than normal is not dangerous; however, it is still important to know about it so that we can check if the aneurysm is getting bigger.

AAA screening is a free NHS national programme that screens men aged 65 plus to check if they have an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The screening is by invitation and uses an ultra sound scan. If you are a man aged over 65 you are more at risk of an abdominal aortic aneurysm that any other demographic so this is why you will be invited for screening.

We offer screening so we can find aneurysms early and monitor or treat them. This greatly reduces the chances of the aneurysm causing serious problems.

Men over 65 who have not previously been screened or diagnosed with an aneurysm can request a scan by contacting their local programme directly on: 0191 445 2554

The North East of England and North Cumbria AAA screening programme is run from The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, you will be invited to a local clinic for an ultra sound scan. Our centre covers the area from North Yorkshire to Berwick and North Cumbria.

Click here for a leaflet with more information on the AAA screening process or here for accessible AAA screening process leaflets

 

The following is a link to a video about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm screening.

https://vimeo.com/dfptv/review/220933933/551f06925f



 
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